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Where Can I Buy High Carbon Steel



Dedicated to achieving customer success, Blue Blade Steel customizes the highest quality high carbon, alloy, and stainless strip steel to your RC scale hardness range in a variety of colors including gold, bright (silver), and blue spring steel. Our inline coil heat treating process offers cost savings, and speed-to-market your customers require. Our long-standing relationships with leading steel mills guarantee you the quality and availability of our steel supply.




where can i buy high carbon steel



Dedicated to achieving customer success, Blue Blade Steel offers the highest quality high carbon, alloy, and stainless strip steel along with customized value-added services that provide you with the material performance, cost savings, and speed-to-market you require. Our long-standing relationships with leading steel mills guarantee you the quality and availability of our steel supply. Additionally, our lead-free steel processing and hardening and tempering services result in material with a lead-free surface that is safer for workers and the environment.


The term carbon steel may also be used in reference to steel which is not stainless steel; in this use carbon steel may include alloy steels. High carbon steel has many different uses such as milling machines, cutting tools (such as chisels) and high strength wires. These applications require a much finer microstructure, which improves the toughness.


Carbon steel is a popular metal choice for knife-making due to its high amount of carbon, giving the blade more edge retention. To make the most out of this type of steel it is very important to heat treat it properly. If not, the knife may end up being brittle, or too soft to hold an edge.


As the carbon percentage content rises, steel has the ability to become harder and stronger through heat treating; however, it becomes less ductile. Regardless of the heat treatment, a higher carbon content reduces weldability. In carbon steels, the higher carbon content lowers the melting point.[2]


In applications where large cross-sections are used to minimize deflection, failure by yield is not a risk so low-carbon steels are the best choice, for example as structural steel. The density of mild steel is approximately 7.85 g/cm3 (7850 kg/m3 or 0.284 lb/in3)[4] and the Young's modulus is 200 GPa (2910^6 psi).[5]


Low-carbon steels display yield-point runout where the material has two yield points. The first yield point (or upper yield point) is higher than the second and the yield drops dramatically after the upper yield point. If a low-carbon steel is only stressed to some point between the upper and lower yield point then the surface develops Lüder bands.[6] Low-carbon steels contain less carbon than other steels and are easier to cold-form, making them easier to handle.[7] Typical applications of low carbon steel are car parts, pipes, construction, and food cans.[8]


High-tensile steels are low-carbon, or steels at the lower end of the medium-carbon range,[citation needed] which have additional alloying ingredients in order to increase their strength, wear properties or specifically tensile strength. These alloying ingredients include chromium, molybdenum, silicon, manganese, nickel, and vanadium. Impurities such as phosphorus and sulfur have their maximum allowable content restricted.


The purpose of heat treating carbon steel is to change the mechanical properties of steel, usually ductility, hardness, yield strength, or impact resistance. Note that the electrical and thermal conductivity are only slightly altered. As with most strengthening techniques for steel, Young's modulus (elasticity) is unaffected. All treatments of steel trade ductility for increased strength and vice versa. Iron has a higher solubility for carbon in the austenite phase; therefore all heat treatments, except spheroidizing and process annealing, start by heating the steel to a temperature at which the austenitic phase can exist. The steel is then quenched (heat drawn out) at a moderate to low rate allowing carbon to diffuse out of the austenite forming iron-carbide (cementite) and leaving ferrite, or at a high rate, trapping the carbon within the iron thus forming martensite. The rate at which the steel is cooled through the eutectoid temperature (about 727 C or 1,341 F) affects the rate at which carbon diffuses out of austenite and forms cementite. Generally speaking, cooling swiftly will leave iron carbide finely dispersed and produce a fine grained pearlite and cooling slowly will give a coarser pearlite. Cooling a hypoeutectoid steel (less than 0.77 wt% C) results in a lamellar-pearlitic structure of iron carbide layers with α-ferrite (nearly pure iron) between. If it is hypereutectoid steel (more than 0.77 wt% C) then the structure is full pearlite with small grains (larger than the pearlite lamella) of cementite formed on the grain boundaries. A eutectoid steel (0.77% carbon) will have a pearlite structure throughout the grains with no cementite at the boundaries. The relative amounts of constituents are found using the lever rule. The following is a list of the types of heat treatments possible:


Case hardening processes harden only the exterior of the steel part, creating a hard, wear-resistant skin (the "case") but preserving a tough and ductile interior. Carbon steels are not very hardenable meaning they can not be hardened throughout thick sections. Alloy steels have a better hardenability, so they can be through-hardened and do not require case hardening. This property of carbon steel can be beneficial, because it gives the surface good wear characteristics but leaves the core flexible and shock-absorbing.


Steel is often categorized according to its carbon content. All steel contains at least some amount of carbon. After all, steel is defined as an alloy of iron and carbon. Without the presence of carbon, it would simply be iron. By adding carbon to it, the metal becomes stronger and harder. This is why many manufacturing and construction companies prefer steel over conventional iron.


Low-carbon steel is characterized by a low ratio of carbon to iron. By definition, low-carbon consists of less than 0.30% of carbon. Also known as mild steel, it costs less to produce than both medium-carbon and high-carbon steel. In addition to its low cost, low-carbon steel is more pliable, which may improve its effectiveness for certain applications while lowering its effectiveness for other applications.


High-carbon steel, of course, has the highest ratio of carbon to iron. It consists of more than 0.60% carbon, thereby changing its physical properties. Also known as carbon tool steel, it has around 0.61% to 1.5% carbon. With such a high carbon content, high-carbon steel is stronger and harder but less ductile than low-carbon and medium-carbon steel.


To recap, steel is often categorized according to its carbon content. Low-carbon steel consists of less than 0.30% carbon. Medium-carbon steel consists of 0.30% to 0.60% carbon. And high-carbon steel contains more than 0.60% carbon. As the carbon content of steel increases, it becomes stronger and harder. At the same time, it also becomes less ductile.


NATURAL NON-STICK MATERIAL: Made of of black carbon steel, a natural mineral material promoting healthy cooking making this pan free of any harsh chemicals or coatings, PTFE and PFOA free, and once seasoned, becomes exceedingly non-stick


HIGHLY COMPATIBLE & VERSATILE: Compatible with all hob types, including induction. With an ability to retain very high temperatures, black carbon steel excels over open fires, on outdoor grills, and in ovens, as well as on all varieties of traditional stove tops


The crude iron used to produce steel has a relatively high amount of carbon. Its carbon composition can be as high as 2.1%, which is the greatest amount of carbon a material can contain and still be considered steel.


The carbon present in steel is typically reduced so that it fits into three main categories of carbon steel: low (or mild), medium and high carbon steel. Each of these categories contain different levels of carbon, show in the chart below.


Some of the most common low carbon steel plate grades, all stocked by Leeco, include ASTM A36, A572 Grades 42 & 50 and A830-1020. Each of these grades have moderate strength, high ductility and lighter weight due to the low carbon content and addition of other alloys. These properties make low carbon steel ideal for use in structural applications like building construction, bridges and transmission towers, where materials must be able to withstand high stress while also being easy to form into structural shapes.


Medium carbon steel provides a balance between low and high carbon steel, offering greater strength and hardness than low carbon steel while still remaining more ductile than high carbon steel. Medium carbon steel also typically contains other alloys, such as manganese, that also contribute to its properties.


High carbon steel offers the greatest strength and hardness compared to mild and medium carbon steel plate. However, high carbon steel is less ductile than lower carbon steels, meaning it is much harder to machine or form.


The high carbon composition of high carbon plate grades gives them great strength, hardness and wear resistance, which are properties ideal in applications where steel must regularly endure extreme wear without breaking, such as cutting and chiseling tools.


Some applications require steel material that can endure forces even greater than that of high carbon steel. In those applications, very high carbon steel, the strongest type of carbon steel, is used. Very high carbon steel is nearly impossible to weld, machine or shape due to its incredible strength and is therefore far less common than the other types of carbon steel. 041b061a72


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